Department of Engineering Fundamentals

Department of Engineering Fundamentals students

The Department of Engineering Fundamentals doesn’t offer degree programs; rather, the department provides the foundation for the degree programs offered by all of the other departments in the College of Engineering.

Freshman students in aerospace engineering, electrical engineering, computer and software engineering, and so on begin with the Department of Engineering Fundamentals and then transition into their degree-oriented work during their second year on campus.

Unlike many universities where foundational courses are likely to be taught in huge lecture halls, our student/teacher ratio is small and faculty members are enthusiastic and engaged, with a love for engineering and education that shows in the classroom.

Faculty members have focused their education and research not just on solving engineering problems, but also on how best to teach engineering. That translates into more hands-on activities and other forms of active learning that take students out of the lecture hall and into the lab. In this way, students get to put theory into practice.

This involves a variety of technologies, from the most advanced computing systems down to the most basic — popsicle sticks and straws. With an approachable, knowledgeable staff that are truly dedicated to encouraging success, students in this department get the best chance possible to move forward into their chosen fields with a firm footing in the basics they need to become great engineers.

Engineering Fundamentals Courses

Course Design

EGR 101 introduces students to the engineering profession. Students will actively learn the design process by participating in two to three team design projects, typically focused on space or aviation-related systems. The different disciplines of engineering will be explored, especially those offered at Embry-Riddle (Aerospace, Civil, Computer, Electrical, Mechanical, and Software Engineering). The interdependency of these disciplines will also be explored through the design of systems that require input from several disciplines of engineering. Professionalism and ethics within the engineering profession are topics that are covered regularly throughout the course.

Semesters Typically Offered

Fall, Spring, and Summer B

Prerequisites

None, but it is advised that students be enrolled in mathematics at the level of Algebra and Trigonometry (MA 140/142) or higher. It is recommended that students be enrolled in Calculus I (MA 241) while taking EGR 101.

Prerequisite For

No classes, but it is a required first-year course for all engineering degrees. It is preferred that the course be taken during the student’s first semester at Embry-Riddle.

Typical Time Allocation From Student

To perform well in EGR 101, students should expect to spend four to seven hours a week outside of class, especially during projects. Students are required to work in teams and are expected to meet outside of class to work on their design projects. Typical sections of EGR 101 require, at a minimum, two design projects. Each student can expect to put in a total of 15-20 hours on each project.

For more information visit the catalog website.

Course Design

EGR 115 introduces the student to programming computers. Beyond fundamentals, the goal of the course is to give students the tools and acumen to continue to develop programming skills after leaving the course. Students will discover solutions to problems that can be solved using a computer and learn to plan out the needed programs. Typically, students will produce about six to 10 programs per semester as well as a final project of their own design and creation.

Semesters Typically Offered

Fall, Spring, Summer A, Summer B

Prerequisites

Algebra and Trigonometry

Prerequisite For

None at this time; recommended for several upper-level courses such as Fluid Dynamics, Orbital Mechanics, etc.

Typical Time Allocation From Student

To perform well in this course, a student should expect to spend approximately six to 10 hours per week outside of class on programs, homework assignments, and research. A course project designed and created by the student is required. Each student dictates her/his own schedule for this project, but surveys of past students suggest that (in addition to other assignments) the student will spend about 30 to 40 hours on the final project over the course of about six weeks.

For more information visit the catalog website.

EGR 115HYB (Hybrid Version of EGR115)

The HYB designator indicates that this course will be taught in a hybrid delivery format. In the hybrid format, all face-to-face lectures from the traditional class sessions are replaced with online activities such as videos, quizzes, and self-exercise. Hybrid courses are best suited for students who are technically competent, self-disciplined, manage their time well, and are highly motivated. The workload is comparable to the traditional section, in that all students should put in daily effort to practice what the lecture/videos show.

Course Design

EGR 120 is designed to teach the student sketching and visualization skills that will be used throughout their academic years and their professional career. The student is introduced to CATIA, a CAD program predominately used in the aerospace industry. As much as possible, aerospace engineering principles, practices, and designs are incorporated into the course.

Semesters Typically Offered

Fall, Spring, Summer A, Summer B

Prerequisites

EGR 195A; or a score of 20 or higher on the PVSTR. 

Prerequisite For

ES 201, Statics 

Typical Time Allocation From Student

To perform well in this course, a student should expect to spend approximately six to 10 hours per week outside of class on homework assignments, solid models, and research. A course project designed and created by the student is required. Each student dictates her/his own schedule for this project, but surveys of past students suggest that (in addition to other assignments) the student will spend about 30 to 40 hours on the final project over the course of about six weeks.

Course Design

In this one-unit course, students will develop a fundamental skill essential for success in engineering -- spatial visualization. Using active-learning techniques, students explore different techniques for representing and visualizing three-dimensional objects, including flat patterns, rotations, symmetry, cutting planes, volumes of rotation, surfaces, and isometric and orthographic views.

Semesters Typically Offered

Fall

Prerequisites

Enrollment in Aerospace, Civil, or Mechanical Engineering

Prerequisite For

EGR 120

Typical Time Allocation From Student

To perform well in this course, a student should expect to spend approximately three to four hours per week outside of class on homework assignments and research. Students will work in teams and are expected to meet outside of class to work on projects.

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600 South Clyde Morris Blvd.
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