ERLI Achievement Scale

The ERLI program is divided into 4 levels:

  • Level 2: High-Beginner level
  • Level 3: Intermediate level
  • Level 4: High-Intermediate level
  • Level 5: Advanced level

Note: In any class at any level, a student must earn a 70% or higher [C, B, or A] before they can progress to the next level in that class.

For example: Student A passes level three reading with a C. This student will next go to level four reading.

Interpretation of the ERLI Achievement Scale

Level 2:

Reading – A student completing Level 2 Reading should be able to…

  • recognize topic and main ideas in readings.

  • find directly stated supporting details in readings.

  • make simple annotations within a reading following teacher guidance.

  • summarize readings orally in 2-3 sentences.

  • share reflections on readings both orally and in writing.
  • skim to identify topic and make meaningful predictions about the text.

  • scan for specific information in a text.
  • make simple logical inferences.
  • understand discourse structures by locating signal words and completing simple graphic organizers.
  • interpret simple charts, graphs, and tables.
  • use a bilingual and/or English-English dictionary to understand key words and expand personal vocabulary.
  • infer meaning of vocabulary from context clues.

  • distinguish word forms/parts of speech.

  • define high-frequency vocabulary and topically relevant vocabulary in course readings.

  • read aloud with correct intonation and pausing.
  • read 30,000 words of graded-reading material consisting of 150-600 headwords by the end of the course with an approximate rate between 138 and 200 wpm while maintaining comprehension.
  • recognize sight words.

Writing – A student completing Level 2 Writing should be able to…

  • write sentences using simple, compound and, to a limited degree, complex grammatical structures as taught in Grammar Two.
  • write sentences without serious errors in spelling and mechanics that interfere with comprehension.
  • demonstrate an ability to write in a variety of paragraph formats such as persuasive, process, narrative, cause & effect, and comparison/contrast.
  • demonstrate an ability to brainstorm and outline a high-beginner-level paragraph.
  • demonstrate an ability to organize a paragraph that includes a topic sentence, body, and conclusion sentence along with appropriate transitions.

  • demonstrate an ability to employ supporting details such as relevant examples and explanations in a cohesive and coherent manner.

  • demonstrate an ability to correctly use high-beginner-level vocabulary.
  • demonstrate an ability to employ a range of sentence structures as described in 1a.

  • demonstrate an ability to write sentences without serious errors in spelling and mechanics that interfere with comprehension.

Grammar – A student completing Level 2 Grammar should be able to…

  • identify nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, articles, quantifiers, and prepositions.

  • use nouns as subjects, subject complements and objects.
  • use count and non-count nouns with their correct quantifiers.
  • demonstrate a beginning understanding and application of subject-verb agreement, and capitalization and punctuation rules.
  • demonstrate an understanding and application of sentence word order in both positive and negative statement, question, and imperative forms.
  • demonstrate knowledge of the simple and continuous verb tense formulas in the past, present, and future in both positive and negative forms.

  • correctly use the simple past, present, and future tenses with the “be” verb in positive and negative statements.
  • correctly use the simple past, present, and future tense with the “be” verb in positive and negative yes/no and WH questions.

  • correctly use the past, present, and future continuous tenses with the “be” verb in positive and negative statements.

  • correctly use the past, present, and future continuous tense with the “be” verb in positive and negative yes/no and WH questions.

  • correctly use the simple past, present, and future tense with action verbs in positive and negative statements.

  • correctly use the simple past, present, and future tense with action verbs in positive and negative yes/no and WH questions.

  • correctly use the past, present, and future continuous tense with action verbs in positive and negative statements.

  • correctly use the past, present, and future continuous tense with action verbs in positive and negative yes/no and WH questions.

  • demonstrate and understanding and application of common transitive and intransitive phrasal verbs in the tenses described above.

  • correctly use simple present modals in positive and negative statements.

  • correctly use present continuous modals in positive and negative statements.

  • correctly use simple present modals in positive and negative questions.

  • correctly use present continuous modals in positive and negative questions.

  • correctly use adverb clauses of time including those with when, before, and after.

  • correctly use adverb clauses of reason including those with because.

  • correctly use adverb clauses of  unexpected result including those with although, even though, and though.

  • Correctly use adverb clauses of contrast including those with whereas.

Listening/Speaking – A student completing Level 2 Listening/Speaking should be able to…

Listening:

  • demonstrate an ability to use short-hand techniques such as some abbreviations, symbols, and acronyms at a high-beginning-level.
  • demonstrate an ability to organize notes from a high-beginner-level lecture by identifying and writing down main ideas and supporting details, employing the use of some key words from a beginner-level lecture
  • demonstrate an ability to pass quizzes/tests based on notes from a high-beginner-level lecture.
  • demonstrate an ability to recognize topics of high-beginning-level listening passages.
  • demonstrate an ability to identify facts directly expressed in beginning-level listening passages.
  • demonstrate an ability to identify opinions directly expressed in high-beginning-level listening passages.
  • demonstrate an ability to make predictions about specific content they will hear in high-beginning-level listening passages. For example, using pictures to predict content.
  • demonstrate an ability to make inferences about specific content they hear in high-beginning-level listening passages.
  • be able to identify syllables at the word level.  

Speaking:

  • demonstrate an ability to use high-beginning-level-appropriate language in the context of organized presentations that include presentation techniques, and can include technological aids
  • demonstrate an ability to use high-beginning-level-appropriate language in the context of formal classroom discussions but mostly in informal classroom conversations.
  • demonstrate an ability to utilize correct grammar and pronunciation in spoken communication at a high-beginning-level.
  • demonstrate an ability to utilize idiomatic language in high-beginning level speaking activities.

Level 3:

Reading – A student completing Level 3 Reading should be able to…

  • identify stated main idea in a reading.
  • distinguish between major and minor supporting details explicitly stated in the passage.
  • paraphrase the explicit main idea.
  • make simple annotations within a reading.
  • share reaction to a reading orally or in writing.
  • skim and scan to make predictions and verify predictions during reading.
  • identify organizational patterns such as examples, definitions, compare & contrast, cause & effect...
  • distinguish fact from opinion.
  • make inferences based on the information in the text and their general knowledge of the world.
  • interpret simple charts, graphs, and tables and apply the information to answer questions.
  • use information from the text to support an opinion.
  • apply vocabulary recognition strategies such as context clues, roots, prefixes, and suffixes.
  • demonstrate knowledge of word families.
  • define vocabulary in course readings.
  • develop knowledge of synonyms and antonyms.

  • read 40,000 words of graded-reading material consisting of 600-1800 head words by the end of the course with an approximate rate between 138 and 200 wpm while maintaining comprehension.

  • read informational texts with 1100 headwords with reading rate of up to 250 wpm while maintaining general comprehension.

  • recognize sight words in prose.

Writing – A student completing Level 3 Writing should be able to…

  • demonstrate an ability to write in a variety of essay formats such as persuasive, cause & effect, narrative, and comparison/contrast.
  • demonstrate an ability to brainstorm and outline an intermediate-level academic essay.
  • demonstrate an ability to organize a multi-paragraph essay that includes an introduction with a thesis, body and conclusion along with appropriate transitions with each paragraph consisting of a minimum of seven lines.
  • demonstrate an ability to employ supporting details such as relevant examples and explanations.
  • demonstrate an ability to use intermediate-level vocabulary with errors than level two.

  • demonstrate an ability to employ a range of sentence structures using simple, compound and complex grammatical structures as taught in grammar three.

  • demonstrate an ability to write with fewer errors in spelling and mechanics than found in level two.

  • demonstrate an ability to produce written responses to non-authentic, intermediate-level texts.
  • demonstrate an ability to paraphrase non-authentic texts written at an intermediate-level and use these skills to avoid plagiarism.

  1. demonstrate an ability to use synonyms appropriately in context in a meaningful way while paraphrasing.
  2. demonstrate an ability to use a variety of intermediate-level grammatical forms in paraphrasing.
  • demonstrate an ability to summarize non-authentic texts written at an intermediate-level while avoiding plagiarism.
  1. demonstrate an ability to identify the main idea and major and minor supporting details in non-authentic texts written at an intermediate-level.
  2. demonstrate an ability to organize a main idea and relevant supporting detail into a summary.

Grammar – A student completing Level 3 Grammar should be able to…

  • demonstrate knowledge of the simple, continuous, perfect, and perfect continuous verb tense formulas in the past, present, and future in both positive and negative forms.
  • correctly use all 12 active past, present, and future tense in positive and negative statements in sentences and longer contexts.
  • correctly use all 12 active past, present, and future tense in positive and negative yes/no and WH questions in sentences and longer contexts.
  • correctly use gerunds and infinitives as subjects with the appropriate subject-verb agreement and parallelism.

  • correctly use gerunds and infinitives as direct objects.

  • correctly use infinitives after an adjective.
  • correctly use simple present modals in positive and negative statements and questions.

  • correctly use present continuous modals in positive and negative statements and questions.

  • correctly use simple past modals in positive and negative statements and questions.

  • correctly use past continuous modals in positive and negative statements and questions.

  • correctly use adverb clauses of reason including those with because, since, and as.

  • correctly use adverb clauses of time including those with when, while, and as,| before, by the time, and until, | after and once, | and since.

  • correctly use adverb clauses of contrast including those with while and whereas.

  • correctly use adverb clauses of  unexpected result including those with although, even though, and though.

  • correctly use adverb clauses of condition including if, unless, whether, and in case. (These serve as a lead-in to conditionals).

  • correctly distinguish between and use common prepositional forms of the adverb subordinators described above.

  • correctly use past real conditionals in their full active forms.

  • correctly use present real conditionals in their full active forms.

  • correctly use future real conditionals in their full active forms.

  • correctly use subject-subject adjective clauses in their full active form.

  • correctly use object-subject adjective clauses in their full active form.

Listening/Speaking – A student completing Level 3 Listening/Speaking should be able to…

Listening:

  • demonstrate an ability to use note-taking techniques to take notes from an intermediate-level listening lecture.
  • demonstrate an ability to use short-hand techniques such as a limited number of abbreviations, symbols, and acronyms while building on those used in level 2 to take notes from an intermediate-level lecture.
  • demonstrate an ability to organize notes from an intermediate-level lecture by identifying and writing down main ideas and supporting details and employing the use of some key words.
  • demonstrate an ability to pass quizzes/tests based on notes from an intermediate-level lecture.
  • demonstrate an ability to comprehend intermediate-level non-authentic academic and non-academic discourse from a variety of listening sources. [class lectures & activities, videos, audio files, etc…]

  • demonstrate an ability to predict, infer, and recognize the difference between facts, estimates, and opinions from intermediate-level listening passages.

  • be able to identify syllables and stress at the word level.

Speaking:

  • demonstrate an ability to use intermediate level-appropriate language in the context of organized presentations that include presentation techniques , and can include technological aids.
  • demonstrate an ability to use intermediate level-appropriate language in the context of formal classroom discussions such as found in debates, as well as informal classroom conversations.
  • demonstrate an ability to utilize correct grammar and pronunciation in an intermediate-level context with fewer errors than level two.
  • demonstrate an ability to utilize idiomatic language in intermediate-level speaking activities.

Level 4:

Reading – A student completing Level 4 Reading should be able to…

  • Identify and understand  stated and implied main ideas and paraphrase them.
  • Distinguish between major and minor supporting details for summary purposes.
  • Annotate text independently while reading.
  • Respond to a reading by explaining an opinion and using support from texts.
  • Skim for main idea and scan for details.
  • Analyze the organizational structure of a reading.
  • Compare ideas across two texts.
  • Make inferences based on the information in the text.

  • Distinguish fact from inference.

  • Understand literary devices such as figurative language, idioms, and metaphors.

  • Use vocabulary recognition strategies such as context clues, roots, prefixes, and suffixes.

  • Demonstrate knowledge of word families.

  • Define vocabulary in course readings and other relevant academic vocabulary.

  • Develop knowledge of synonyms and antonyms.

  • Use vocabulary from class readings appropriately in context in a meaningful way.

  • Read 60,000 words of graded-reading material consisting of 1000-2500 head words by the end of the course with an approximate rate between 138 and 200 wpm while maintaining comprehension.

  • Read informational texts with 1500 headwords with reading rate up to 250 wpm while maintaining general comprehension.

  • Recognize sight words in prose.

Writing – A student completing Level 4 Writing should be able to…

  • demonstrate an ability to write in a variety of essay formats to include persuasive, cause & effect, comparison/contrast and argumentative.

  • demonstrate an ability to brainstorm and outline a high-intermediate-level academic essay.

  • demonstrate an ability to organize a multi-paragraph essay that includes an introduction with a thesis, body and conclusion along with appropriate transitions with each paragraph consisting of a minimum of eight lines.
  • demonstrate an ability to employ supporting details such as relevant examples, statistics and explanations occasionally paraphrased from controlled high-intermediate sources.
  • demonstrate an ability to use high-intermediate-level vocabulary with fewer errors than level three.
  • demonstrate an ability to employ a range of sentence structures using more complex grammatical structures than taught in level three with fewer errors than level three.
  • demonstrate an ability to write with fewer errors in spelling and mechanics than found in level three.

  • demonstrate an ability to produce written responses to authentic and non-authentic, high-intermediate-level texts.
  • demonstrate an ability to incorporate support paraphrased from authentic and non-authentic high-intermediate-level texts.
  • demonstrate an ability to paraphrase authentic and non-authentic texts written at a high-intermediate-level and use these skills to avoid plagiarism.

  1. demonstrate an ability to use synonyms appropriately in context in a meaningful way while paraphrasing.
  2. demonstrate an ability to use a variety of high-intermediate-level grammatical forms in paraphrasing.
  • demonstrate an ability to summarize authentic and non-authentic texts written at a high-intermediate-level while avoiding plagiarism.
  1. demonstrate an ability to identify the main idea and major and minor supporting details in authentic and non-authentic texts written at a high-intermediate-level.
  2. demonstrate an ability to organize a main idea and relevant supporting detail into a summary.

Grammar – A student completing Level 4 Grammar should be able to…

  • demonstrate knowledge of the simple, continuous, perfect, and perfect continuous passive verb tense formulas in the past, present, and future in both positive and negative forms.

  • correctly use all 12 passive past, present, and future tense in positive and negative statements in sentences and longer contexts.
  • correctly use subject-object and object-object adjective clauses in their full active form.

  • correctly use relative pronoun deletion with subject-object and object-object adjective clauses.

  • correctly use subject-object and object-object adjective clauses in their passive, reduced, and fronted forms.

  • correctly use subject-subject and object-subject adjective clauses with “be” in their full, reduced, and fronted forms. [“be” + a preposition, & appositives].

  • correctly use subject-subject and object-subject adjective clauses with action verbs in their full, reduced, and fronted forms.

  • correctly use adverb clauses of reason, time, contrast, unexpected result, and condition in their full active forms. [Refer to EGM 003 for a complete list of subordinators].

  • correctly use adverb clauses of time, contrast, unexpected result, and condition in their active reduced form.

  • correctly use adverb clauses of reason, time, contrast, unexpected result, and condition in their full passive form.

  • correctly use adverb clauses of time, contrast, unexpected result, and condition in their passive reduced form.

  • correctly use past, present, and future real conditionals in their full active forms.

  • correctly use past, present, and future real conditionals in their active fronted/inverted forms.

  • correctly use past, present, and future real conditionals in their full passive forms.

  • correctly use past, present, and future real conditionals in their passive fronted/inverted forms.

  • correctly use present and past unreal conditionals in their full active forms.

  • correctly use present and past unreal conditionals in their simple and continuous active fronted/inverted forms.

  • correctly use present and past unreal conditionals in their full passive forms.

  • correctly use present and past unreal conditionals in their simple and continuous passive fronted/inverted forms.

  • demonstrate an understanding of noun clause subordinators and their meanings.

  • correctly use noun clauses as direct objects in both their active and passive forms.

  • correctly use noun clauses as subjects in both their active and passive forms.

  • correctly use noun clauses as subject complements in both their active and passive forms.

Listening/Speaking – A student completing Level 4 Listening/Speaking should be able to…

Listening:

  • demonstrate an ability to use note-taking techniques such as the Cornell method, Mind Mapping, and /or outlining to take notes from a high-intermediate-level lecture.
  • demonstrate an ability to use short-hand techniques such as abbreviations, symbols, and acronyms to take notes from a high-intermediate-level lecture
  • demonstrate an ability to organize notes from a high-intermediate-level lecture by identifying and writing down main ideas and supporting details, and employing the use of key words.
  • demonstrate an ability to pass quizzes/tests based on notes from an academic or non-academic high-intermediate-level lecture
  • demonstrate an ability to comprehend non-authentic and authentic high-intermediate-level academic listening discourse.
  • demonstrate an ability to predict, infer, and recognize the difference between fact and opinion within a high-intermediate-level listening discourse.

Speaking:

  • demonstrate an ability to use high-intermediate-level language in the context of organized presentations that include presentation techniques , and should include technological aids
  • demonstrate an ability to use high-intermediate-level language in the context of formal classroom discussions such as found in debates, as well as informal classroom conversations
  • demonstrate an ability to use high-intermediate-level language to utilize facts, estimates [statistics], and opinions to support an argument.
  • demonstrate an ability to utilize idiomatic language in high-intermediate-level speaking activities.
  • demonstrate an ability to utilize correct grammar and pronunciation in high-intermediate-level contexts with fewer errors than level three

Level 5:

Reading – A student completing Level 5 Reading should be able to…

  • Identify stated and implied main ideas in a range of text types.
  • Identify major and minor supporting details and evaluate relevance of information.
  • Paraphrase the explicit and implied main idea in a range of adapted academic texts.
  • Summarize information from various text types for various purposes with attributive devices.
  • Make meaningful predictions and check on predictions during reading.
  • Outline the organizational structure of the reading.
  • Evaluate text for author’s purpose, bias, tone, and point of view.
  • Make inferences based on the information in the text, charts, graphs, and tables.
  • Compare ideas across multiple texts.
  • Identify literary devices such as figurative language, idioms, and metaphors.
  • Use vocabulary recognition strategies such as context clues, roots, prefixes, and suffixes.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of word families.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of synonyms and antonyms.
  • Demonstrate receptive knowledge of vocabulary from class readings and from the AWL.
  • Use vocabulary appropriately in context in a meaningful way.
  • Read 80,000 words of graded-reading material consisting of 1800-3000 head words by the end of the course with an approximate rate between 138 and 200 wpm while maintaining comprehension.
  • Read informational texts with 2000 headwords with reading rate up to 250 wpm and adapted academic texts with reading rate between 150-190 wpm while maintaining general comprehension.

Writing – A student completing Level 5 Writing should be able to…

  • demonstrate an ability to write in a variety of essay formats to include, but not limited to argumentative, comparison/contrast, cause & effect, and expository.

  • demonstrate an ability to brainstorm and outline an advanced-level academic essay.
  • demonstrate an ability to organize a multi-paragraph essay that includes an introduction with a thesis, body and conclusion along with appropriate transitions with each paragraph consisting of a minimum of eight lines.
  • demonstrate an ability to employ supporting details such as relevant examples, statistics and explanations paraphrased from advanced-level sources.

  • demonstrate an ability to use advanced-level vocabulary with limited errors.

  • demonstrate an ability to employ a range of sentence structures using more complex grammatical structures as taught in level four with limited errors.
  • demonstrate an ability to write with limited errors in spelling and mechanics.

  • demonstrate an ability to produce written responses to authentic and non-authentic texts at an advanced-level.

  • demonstrate an ability to incorporate support paraphrased from authentic advanced-level academic and literary texts.
  • demonstrate an ability to select and then paraphrase relevant information from a text to support an opinion, main idea, or thesis.

  • demonstrate an ability to paraphrase authentic texts written at an advanced-level and use these skills to avoid plagiarism.

  1. demonstrate an ability to use academic synonyms appropriately in context in a meaningful way while paraphrasing.

  2. demonstrate an ability to use a variety of advanced-level grammatical forms in paraphrasing.

  • demonstrate an ability to summarize authentic texts written at an advanced-level while avoiding plagiarism.

  1. demonstrate an ability to identify the most important information in authentic texts written at an advanced-level and make judgements in the selection of supporting details for research purposes.

  2. demonstrate an ability to organize a main idea/thesis and relevant supports into a summary.

Listening/Speaking – A student completing Level 5 Listening/Speaking should be able to…

Listening:

  • demonstrate an ability to use note-taking techniques such as the Cornell method, Mind Mapping, and /or outlining to take notes from an advanced-level listening lecture.
  • demonstrate an ability to use short-hand techniques such as extensive use of abbreviations, symbols, and acronyms to take notes from an advanced-level lecture
  • demonstrate an ability to organize notes from an advanced-level academic lecture by identifying and writing down main ideas and supporting details, employing the use of key words
  • demonstrate an ability to pass quizzes/tests based on notes from an advanced-level lecture
  • demonstrate an ability to comprehend advanced-level authentic academic listening discourse such as that commonly found within a university classroom.
  • demonstrate an ability to predict, infer, and recognize the difference between fact and opinion within an advanced-level listening passage

Speaking:

  • demonstrate an ability to use advanced-level language in the context of organized presentations that include presentation techniques and technological aids.
  • demonstrate an ability to use advanced-level language in the context of formal classroom discussions such as found in debates, as well as informal classroom conversations.
  • demonstrate an ability to use advanced-level language to utilize facts, estimates [statistics], and opinions to support an argument.
  • demonstrate an ability utilize correct grammar and pronunciation in an advanced-level context with fewer errors than level four.
  • demonstrate an ability to utilize idiomatic language in advanced-level level speaking activities.