Daytona Beach Campus

Bachelor of Science in Air Traffic Management

  • OVERVIEW
  • ADVANTAGES
  • REQUIREMENTS
  • CAREERS

Overview

The Applied Aviation Sciences Department offers a Bachelor of Science degree in Air Traffic Management (ATM). This degree is designed for students whose goal is to become air traffic controllers or seek employment in a related industry. The academic courses are designed to provide exposure to procedures and operations consistent with those found in Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) air traffic control facilities. The ATM curriculum provides the knowledge and foundation designated by the FAA for eventual student entry into the FAA Academy where they will be integrated with graduates of other Collegiate Training Initiative (CTI) schools for additional air traffic control training.

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Advantages

If you’ve dreamed of being in air traffic control, you won't find a better starting place than Embry-Riddle's program. As one of the few FAA-approved air traffic control programs in the country, we’ll put you on the cutting edge of system changes now on the horizon that will introduce new methods and means for managing the world’s aviation arteries.

You’ll study in state-of-the-art facilities with professors who have actually worked as air traffic controllers. Embry-Riddle's Air Traffic Control Simulation Laboratory is the largest interactive air traffic control laboratory in the United States, with the most advanced equipment available.

Embry-Riddle is one of many approved ATC training schools under the FAA’s Collegiate Training Initiative. With the  combination of our faculty and top-of-the-line lab equipment, as a graduate you will have a decided edge. This fast-paced, exciting field offers exceptional opportunity with earning potential which will surprise you. Graduates of this program will be prepared for entry-level ATC manager positions. Most jobs will be with the U.S. government or military.

As an ATM student, you'll be spending a lot of time on the third floor of our new Aviation Sciences Building, which contains the following simulation laboratories:

  • Air Traffic Control Simulation Laboratories
  • Air Traffic Management Research Laboratory
  • Weather Center
  • Meteorology Laboratories

Requirements

View requirements for the B.S. in Air Traffic Management degree on the Catalog site.

Careers

The ATM curriculum provides the knowledge and foundation designated by the FAA for eventual student entry into the FAA Academy where they will be integrated with graduates of other Collegiate Training Initiative (CTI) schools for additional air traffic control training.

Job Outlook

  • 85 percent of U.S. air traffic controllers (14,000) will be eligible for retirement over the next decade
  • Controllers are among the highest paid in government service
  • Graduates of this program will have a decided advantage in these jobs

Air Traffic Controller Positions

Scott Dittamo, Embry-Riddle graduate and air traffic controller at the busy Newark tower:

"Some people think we’re glued to one position for eight hours. Not true. I’ll come in at 6:30 a.m. and work one position until 7:30, then switch to another." 


The positions are: flight data (complete the hourly traffic count, issue the current terminal information or hourly weather and post arrival and departure strips into the flight strip holders); clearance delivery (read or send via computer the pilot’s flight plan and issue re-routes to pilots if the original plan is changed by weather or volume); flow control (assist the ground controller during heavy departure pushes); ground control (ensure separation of aircraft on the ground by issuing taxi instructions and direction to the departure runway and “weaving in” arrival aircraft to their gates); local control (clear aircraft for takeoff and landing, separating them on final approach and departure); Class Bravo Airspace (work helicopters and light aircraft through Newark’s airspace and helicopters to and from Manhattan); and cab coordination (serve local and ground control as an extra set of eyes).